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Health Interventions and Behind the Scenes of Global Financing!
GFO issue 444

Health Interventions and Behind the Scenes of Global Financing!

Author:

Aidspan

Article Type:
Editor's Note

Article Number: 1

Our first February newsletter and first under a new editor covers the success of Cape Verde against malaria and the buzz around global financing models, in terms of evaluation as well as modes of engagement. These include the Global Public Investment model, Office of the Inspector General’s audit of the Global Fund’s health and laboratory-related Investments, the Secretariat’s review of the Global Fund’s strengthening resilient and sustainable systems for health-pandemic preparedness and response (RSSH-PPR), a report by Harm Reduction International on the international aid flows to end the menace of drugs as well as the Dakar meeting organized by the African Constituency Bureau for West and Central Africa to look back and look ahead. In conclusion, we highlight The Initiative’s SOFIA Expression of Interest.

After an enforced break due to a tech meltdown, we are pleased to bring out our February issue. This issue also happens to be my first as editor with a lot of help from Ida, Christian and Amida and support from George, Samuel and Michel as well as Caleb, Brian and Jacqueline and many others behind the scenes who make this newsletter possible. A shout-out to previous editors Arlette and Christelle for nurturing the Global Fund Observer and best wishes to you!

 

In our first article, translated from our French counterpart Observateur du Fonds Mondial (OFM), we bring the heartening news of Cape Verde being certified as malaria-free, only the third African country to obtain this WHO certification! The article elaborates on how it was done and what all was involved in the process. Cape Verde’s government showed that it is not just about obtaining much-needed financing but following it up with laser focus on prioritizing health and ensuring that health staff are trained well.

 

Article 2 focuses on the report on the Global Public Investment model, which reshapes the discourse around sustainability in finance and how! It frees it from the traditional and hitherto lopsided models, which trapped countries to be recipients of donor countries, both terms, which have long passed their sell-by date. Instead the new model proposes that sustainability must have everyone across the spectrum of stakeholders: states, civil society, communities, global and regional agencies and financial aid organisations knocking heads together to draw up the way to go to combat climate change while ensuring health equity.

 

Article 3 delves into the Office of the Inspector General’s audit of the Global Fund’s health and laboratory-related investments through the Global Fund’s value for money framework. The article is more of a bird’s eye view of the audit and does not get into details of each investment category findings.

 

Article 4 is a write-up on the review of the Secretariat on the Global Fund’s strengthening resilient and sustainable systems for health-pandemic preparedness and response (RSSH-PPR)  over Grant Cycle 6 and to be done in Grant Cycle 7. The review covers the Secretariat’s presentation, which included what worked, what could be done better and the way forward.

 

Article 5 is about the Dakar meeting organized by the African Constituency Bureau for West and Central Africa, which was also a review of the Global Fund Cycle 6 and towards Grant Cycle 7. The meet provided a forum for the 12 countries taking part to learn from each other with best practices showcased and reflecting on what needs to be done in the attainment of the goal of eradicating AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria.

 

Article 6 covers the report by Harm Reduction International on the international aid flows against the trade of drugs, pointing out how financial aid directed at the narcotics trade often obscures the reality of the marginalized and ends up conferring punitive action a hallowed status when what is needed is a more humane approach.

 

One of the oft-repeated observations across the reviews and meeting the challenge of getting all voices heard, was the need to get civil society on board. Hence, we end in Article 7, with The Initiative’s SOFIA Expression of Interest call that will provide financial and technical assistance to community-based organizations in eligible countries. The article, translated from our French counterpart OFM, serves as a timely reminder that international finance needs to be routed to smaller organizations who do not have the wherewithal to access the traditional process for the same.

 

If you like what you read, do spread the word around and ask others to subscribe!

 

And any thoughts about which aspect in the global health initiative sector you’d like to see covered in our newsletter are always welcome and we’d really appreciate suggestions on who can pen an article on it! Anyone who wishes to voluntarily contribute as a guest columnist and provide an incisive analysis or first-person account of what is happening at micro or macro levels in the field of global health interventions is also welcome. Any feedback and suggestions in French, Spanish, English can be sent to Ida Hakizinka ida.hakizinka@aidspan.org and/or in English to madhuri@aidspan.org

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