Aidspan releases first-ever documentary, "I didn't want to bring shame on my family": growing up gay in Ghana

9. PRESS RELEASE
1 Dec 2014

Aidspan, the independent watchdog of The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, TB and Malaria, is pleased to announce the release of its first-ever documentary film, "I didn't want to bring shame on my family": growing up gay in Ghana.

The film was released on December 1, 2014, to coincide with the global celebration of World AIDS Day.

The film is available on Vimeo at https://vimeo.com/114014571

The eight-minute documentary explores a young man's journey through the Ghanaian public health system: a network of facilities both large and small that is largely supported by international donors led by the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, TB and malaria. It reflects the challenges inherent in reaching those who are most vulnerable to infection by HIV, and underscores the impact of stigma, discrimination and ignorance on the health system's ability to effectively manage HIV.

The story is told from the perspective of Joe "Hillary" Afful, a dynamic and engaged leader in Ghana's gay community. A peer educator and counselor trained in programs that have received Global Fund support, Hillary shares his experiences in the public health system and provides a window into the hurdles that young men face in trying to access services in a supportive and non-judgmental way. Hillary wants his story to help encourage other men who have sex with men to not be afraid, to know their status and to take the appropriate measures to seek the right kind of medical attention.

The film was shot with the consent of all the participants, including representatives of Ghana's National AIDS Control Program and the country coordinating mechanism responsible for oversight of Global Fund activities in Ghana.

Aidspan is the leading independent analyst and explainer of the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, TB and malaria, at global and national levels. In expanding its role as critical friend of the Global Fund, Aidspan aims to deepen and widen its own visibility and reach, to improve understanding of our own impact on the Global Fund and the implementation of Global Fund-supported programming.

A better-run, better understood Global Fund means that every dollar spent will help save lives from AIDS, TB and malaria. A more visible Aidspan means that stakeholders involved in the Global Fund's system and processes can be assured that they have the most complete, detailed and unbiased information about that system and those processes.


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